Search TESS:

.

Submitting a TESS proposal

  1. Who is eligible to submit a proposal?
  2. When is the deadline for submission of a proposal?
  3. How do I submit a proposal?
  4. How long can my proposal be?
  5. What information must my proposal include?
  6. Can I submit more than one proposal at a time?
  7. What kinds of proposals are most likely to be successful?
  8. My proposal is neither experimental nor quasi-experimental. Will TESS accept it?
  9. How many items can I include? How many subjects can I have?
  10. Why are there limits on what I can ask for?
  11. What other items are included in the standard TESS data delivery?
  12. What additional items can be added to the TESS data delivery for my study?
  13. What if I need more respondent-questions than described above?
  14. What if my survey employs open-ended questions?
  15. What if I want to sample a specific subpopulation?
  16. What if I want to conduct an endowment experiment?
  17. What if I want to conduct an experiment that involves deception?
  18. Can TESS provide information on response times?
  19. Can I do randomized block designs using TESS?
  20. Are there limits on the number of experiments that I can run on TESS?
  21. How do I submit a proposal to TESS's Short Studies Program (SSP)?

Who is eligible to submit a proposal?

Any faculty member, postdoctoral fellow, or graduate student of any social
science or social science-related department anywhere in the world. We regret that we cannot provide opportunities to any other individuals and groups.

When is the deadline for submission of a proposal?

Proposals are being accepted now and on a continuous basis. Excepting special competitions, TESS has no submission deadlines.

How do I submit a proposal?

All proposals must be submitted through our proposal handling system.

Each proposal must also designate a contact author. The contact author must be listed first on all proposal documents and is the person to whom all official TESS corresponds will be held.

How long can my proposal be?

Proposals are limited to five pages of text (including footnotes/endnotes), plus references, up to two pages of tables, and the actual survey items to be included.

Power analyses, which are encouraged, may also be referenced in the main text and placed in a short appendix that does not count against the five page limit. When revisions are invited to proposals, these may be accompanied by a memo that details changes; concision here is encouraged. The entire proposal with all appendices or supplements of any sort may not exceed twenty pages under any circumstances.

Proposals must be double-spaced and 12 point font. A smaller font is allowed in footnotes and endnotes, and there are not specific formatting requirements for tables.

Proposals that exceed these limits will be returned by TESS staff.

What information must my proposal include?

To be successful, a proposal must include:

  1. A title, provided at the top of the first page of the proposal.
  2. A thorough description of the study design.
  3. An explanation of how the study will make a valuable contribution to science and society.
  4. An explanation of how people in other scientific disciplines will benefit from this study.
  5. A request for a particular number of respondent-items with justification.
  6. An appendix with actual questions and description of stimuli.

In sum, the proposed experiments must evaluate important and clearly-stated hypotheses and be likely to generate new and broadly-applicable knowledge.

To preserve the anonymity of the review process, we ask that all proposals be stripped of content that identifies the proposer. Since proposals are linked to their authors by their user profiles, there is no need to include any of this information in the proposal itself.  Proposer names should not be listed on the front page or any page of the proposal, although references to previous research that are in stated in the third person are acceptable. If a proposal includes self-identifying content, it will be returned to the contact author along with a request that it be resubmitted without this information.

Can I submit more than one proposal at a time?

Yes.

What kinds of proposals are most likely to be successful?

We seek proposals that break new ground in the hypotheses they investigate, the procedures they employ, or both.

The key to TESS success is to win over reviewers in your chosen field. Ideally, your proposal should offer the potential for a clear scientific advance whose relevance expands beyond any one discipline.

Proposals that report trial runs of novel and focal ideas will be viewed as more credible.

While not required, it is desirable if the proposal is conducted in coordination with non-TESS data collection endeavors, such as traditional laboratory experiments or field work.

My proposal is neither experimental nor quasi-experimental. Will TESS accept it?

No. See here for an elaboration of what we mean by an experimental design. 

How many items can I include? How many subjects can I have?

The "size" of a TESS experiment is a function of both the length of the experiment and the number of respondents (N). The shorter the experiment, the more respondents on which it can be conducted. This page provides the maximum N for studies of different length, as well as guidelines for how study length is calculated. Note that experiments that involve subsampling will involve some % reduction in the maximum N.

This allotment does not include the demographic and socioeconomic data that TESS provides for all studies. The standard delivery includes:

  1. Gender
  2. Race/ethnicity
  3. Age
  4. Education
  5. Household income
  6. Employment status
  7. Marital status
  8. # of members in household
  9. Whether R is household head
  10. Home ownership
  11. Whether R has Internet access (other than the WebTV access provided for those respondents who otherwise do not have Internet access)
  12. State of residence
  13. Party affiliation
  14. Political ideology
  15. Religious affiliation
  16. Religious service attendance

More information on the precise measurements provided for family income is available here.

Why are there limits on what I can ask for?

TESS provides a free service to investigators whose proposals are endorsed by the external reviewers, relevant Associate PI's and can meet standard human subjects requirements without placing an extraordinary burden on TESS resources. That TESS is a collective endeavor implies that there are strict limits on what services we can provide to any one investigator.

The resource limits stated herein are real. Proposals are more likely to succeed, both in the review process and then once out in the field, if these limits are strictly interpreted.

What other items are included in every TESS data delivery?

A list of the items included for free in the TESS data delivery from GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks) is provided here.

What additional items can be added to the TESS data delivery for my study?

TESS is conducted in the course of GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks) panel surveys, which also include sets of "profile" variables. Investigators in TESS studies may add profile variables to their studies, which are counted as just a fraction of an original survey item. The profile variables expected to be of most interest to TESS investigators are those on the Public Affairs Profile and the Health Profile.

What if I need more respondent-questions than described above?

In a limited number of cases, TESS can provide additional respondent-questions. Such requests, however, are required to pass higher review standards than regular proposals. If the request entails substantial additional costs on TESS, we will have to reject the proposal or ask the proposer to pay the additional cost.

What if my survey employs open-ended questions?

Researchers who intend to employ open-ended questions in their surveys should be aware that the maximum character limit for responses to such questions is 4000 characters. Researchers who anticipate needing over 1000 characters for these questions should specify this in their proposal.

What if I want to sample a specific subpopulation?

TESS can provide samples of subpopulations, depending upon the type of subpopulation sought and the expense involved in reaching an adequate number of people within such a group.If, however, the request entails substantial additional costs for TESS, we will have to reject the proposal or ask the proposer to pay the additional costs.

What if I want to conduct an endowment experiment?

An endowment experiment is an experiment in which a real-stakes reward is offered to participants. For example, participants may be offered a choice between some payoff for sure and a larger payoff that is subject to a gamble, where a payment in real money is made to the participant in accordance with their choice. TESS can be used to perform such experiments, but the investigator will have to provide funds (1) to cover the actual payments to respondents and (2) a 15% surcharge to GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks) for handling the distribution of payments to respondents. In other words, if an endowment effect distributes $5 on average to 1000 respondents, the investigator will need to provide $5750 ($5000 for the payments and $750 for the surcharge).

What if I want to conduct an experiment that involves deception?

All TESS studies require IRB approval from the investigator's home institution and so would any deception would likewise need to be approved. In addition, any deception would need to be approved for fielding by GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks), which has conducted studies that provide a short 1-2 paragraph textual debriefing afterward.

Can TESS provide information on response times?

Yes. TESS can provide information on response times in tenths--milliseconds for an extra charge--and can also present stimuli to experiments for a length of time specified in milliseconds.

Can I do randomized block designs using TESS?

Yes. In a randomized block design, randomization is done within categories of a variable and can improve the efficiency (power) of a study. Blocking can be done on profile variables that have been collected by GfK (formerly Knowledge Networks) prior to the administration of your study.

Are there limits on the number of experiments that I can run on TESS?

There are no limits on the number of times investigators may use TESS. In fact, we encourage investigators to build on their previous TESS findings for subsequent proposals.

How do I submit a proposal to TESS's Short Studies Program (SSP)?

To submit a proposal to TESS's Short Studies Program please click here.

 


Copyright © 2014, TESS